gradientlair:

One of the women who follow my blog’s Twitter (@GradientLair) said that a gay man grabbed her breasts and said it is okay because he is gay. Another said that a gay man even punched her in the breast (goddamn…) and thought it was okay.

Um just…no.

This is sexual assault and triggering…

westendblues:

please stop calling Black children who have different interests and tastes white

it’s damaging and alienating

(via black-culture)

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global

(via black-culture)

"fail splendidly. fail comfortably. use failure as a redirect. not as a measure of your worth or value. fail beautifully."

— nayyirah waheed (via nayyirahwaheed)

(via nayyirahwaheed)

"The cruel joke of life is the feeling of limitations and reality of endless possibilities constantly tugging at each other. We all wake up everyday believing that all we can do is go to our job, school, or similar duties, spend our days in our self-prescribed bubbles, then go back to sleep, defeated by our boundaries. Then, out of the blue we are inspired by a quote, a song, a speech, a book to peek outside our box, to imagine what life would, or could be, like if we only took one step out of our own way."

Chinwe Ohanele; Leadership Doubt Syndrome (via africaisdonesuffering)

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.

Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

(via africaisdonesuffering)

(Source: ezibota, via ezibota)

"Black art is not a free for all.
Black art is not a free for all.
Black art is not free for all.
It is free for none of y’all non-Black people. It is created for Black people to get their lives, to recover their wits, to see themselves and their stories reflected, and to be healed and uplifted. Black people need this. When we come home from surviving in the world where we are made to be small and hopeless, we need our Black magic. We need it to heal us from the daily soul wounds we are exposed to—from the humiliating assumptions and character assassinations to the public executions. Black art gives us back our dignity, re-affirms our right to exist, raises a voice and words to our anger, hurt, and frustration. Black art is our only potable water, our healing balm."

Nadijah Robinson, “Black Art is Not A Free For All (via ethiopienne)

(Source: y2kalypse, via ethiopienne)